Tuesday, July 27, 2010

The Water of Tyne

I have a few subjects I am working on to post in the future, as well as some more sewing, but in the meantime, you might like to hear something beautiful.

Boatmen in a Wooded River Landscape




Boatmen in a Wooded River Landscape

Giclee Print


Sanchez-perrier,...

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A View of Newcastle from the River Tyne




A View of Newcastle from the River Tyne

Giclee Print


Richardson,...

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The following song is for all those who enjoy acapella.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuFbjTBeXIM


WATERS OF TYNE




I cannot get tae my love if I would dee

For the waters of Tyne run between him and me

And here I maun stand wi a tear in my ee

All sighin and sobbin, my true love to see



Oh where is the boatman, my bonny hinney

Oh where is the boatman, go bring him to me

For to ferry me over the Tyne to my honey

Or speed him across the rough waters to me



Oh bring me a boatman, I`ll gi all my money

And you for your trouble rewarded shall be

If you`ll carry me over the Tyne to my honey

And I will remember the boatman and thee



I cannot get tae my love if I would dee

For the waters of Tyne run between him and me

And here I maun stand wi a tear in my ee

All sighin and sobbin, my true love to see

The Boatman




The Boatman

Art Print


Japy, L.

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You might also enjoy this folk song.

14 comments:

LadyLydia said...

If it just spins and will not start, try pushing the dial to the right a little to get it started.

LadyLydia said...

There are several versions of the song and these words do not match her words exactly.

Emmarinda said...

How strange, I just met a woman from either South or North Shields, right by the mouth of the Tyne. She had come to this country for her son's wedding (we know the bride), and had never been on a plane before now. Not only that, but she had never even been out of England. She says the people in her part of England call themselves Jordies, and their accent sounds almost Scottish, due to their close proximity to Scotland, although she'd never been there, either. It was just neat to meet her and ply her with my usual 40 thousand questions I have about everything and everyone!

Jenny said...

That is just lovely. Thanks for sharing.

Anonymous said...

Mmmnnn.....beautiful acapella!! Thanks so much for a delightful break in my day!

DixieRedHand said...

Lovely air,lovely words and lovely singing. Thanks for sharing it LadyLydia. I like too the Ulster Scots corner.

LadyLydia said...

There is a bit of northern accent like that on Wives and Daughters and North and South, much like I hear in the Ulster-Scots. The Ulster Scots accent is very prominent in the American accent.

LadyLydia said...

I especially appreciated the history of the Ulster-Scots in America because they could survive in hard times and even thrive, they were inventive, they minded their own business and were not socially dependent. The ones I grew up around had large families which they taught to produce their own food, build houses and fish. Many created their own industries. We were all avid readers and able to do many things with our hands, from woodwork to mechanics. My father built a boat himself and used it as a fishing vessel to make a living himself. Many of the people of Ulster Scot heritage (called Scots-Irish in America) were excited about life and ready to do anything to provide for their families. Not only that, but they were also very musical; some knew how to play instruments (Ulster-Scot music is similar to the American folk music) and they loved to sing. If they did not have something, they found a way to make it themselves. They formed the American culture that way: independent, can-do, do-it-yourself-ers who just needed the help of God.

Emmarinda said...

In the book, "The Millionaire Next Door", the author pointed out that those here of Scottish descent had a disproportionately high percentage of self-made millionaires. And when I visited Scotland, I learned how the English, in retaliation for the failed insurrection of Bonnie Prince Charlie, drove most people from their homes in the highlands, which forced many to emigrate to various places around the world: North America, Australia, New Zealand, etc. The silver lining to that cloud was that most of them did extremely well with their lives and fortunes in the new lands. A most resourceful folk, indeed.

LadyLydia said...

I would really be interested in reading that book. I read in one article that the Victorians carried their Ulster-Scots beliefs of hard work and accomplishment with them and taught their children to be industrious, inventive, resourceful,thrifty and creative.

Emmarinda said...

I think you would like the book. Many fascinating facts came out about the self-made millionaires of today. For instance, most all of them
are in stable, long marriages in which both parties are noted for their self-restraint in spending. One man had finally made it big and wanted to surprise his wife with a check for one million dollars. When he came into the kitchen to hand it to her, she was cutting out coupons at the kitchen table. Upon receiving the check, she looked up gratefully to him and said, "I appreciate this; I really do", whereupon she resumed cutting out the coupons.

Ullishman said...

Re NE England think it is 'Geordies' because of king George

DixieRedHand said...

Just to clarify my comment about the 'Geordies'. The story goes as 'Bonnie Prince Charlie' crossed into England he was expecting support from those living in the north-east of England but instead they gave their support to King George,and forever afterwards were known as 'Geordies'

DixieRedHand said...

Great musical video of the Ulster-Scots movement to America

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05z5ZXKHKbY

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