Monday, March 28, 2011

Tea in Art


A Convivial
by  Otto Goldmann  (1844 - 1915) Germany


Try clicking this picture to enjoy a larger view. It was called a two-dimensional painting. There are a lot of interesting details in this picture, and if you are homeschooling, you might ask your children to list everything they see here,  as well as what relation the people might be to one another.

18 comments:

Lillibeth said...

It looks like the lady who is the subject of the joke is a visitor-- see her purse on the table? And she has a big shawl on as if she had been out and about. Also there is a blue shawl draped on the chair next to her, and a tea cup in front of that chair. I wonder who just left. And everyone has a different tea cup!

Anonymous said...

The piece of cake is sitting on the table cloth rather than on a plate for the lady with the brown shawl. The window full of brightness in an adjoining room to the rear shows one view of the two-dimensional aspect you mentioned. The potted plant on the sill there looks lovely. The expressions on the faces as well as the postures of the folks, especially those of the elderly woman, make me wonder what the conversation is about! Very interesting!

LadyLydia said...

The people facing us in the painting seem to be amused at something. They are all looking at the woman whose purse is on the table.

LadyLydia said...

There has to be a story in this painting. If only we knew! Why is one chair empty and why is the shawl there? I wonder what kind of cake it was.

Anonymous said...

The women all resemble one another. It appears the oldest woman is the grandmother, the youngest visitor may be a visiting granddaughter and the middle aged woman her mother.
The two gentlemen appear to be father and grandfather.
My take of the painting is possibly a returning daughter and a friend for a visit. Perhaps she brings good news of a new member on the way and everyone is giving her familial advise on how to raise a child.
I notice the father's tea cup is much larger then the ladies tea cups. I possess such a moustache cup that belonged to my husband's grandfather.

Linda said...

The samovar on the table declares this to be a Russian home.

LadyLydia said...

The painter is German, and samavars may have been familiar to his country at that time.

LadyLydia said...

the painting on the easil in the background is of another era. Perhaps they enjoyed the art of the past just like we do today.

Anonymous said...

Notice the white cloth that protects the fancier tablecloth. And while the man's cup is extra large, all the cups look larger than usual teacup size.

Many of the books in the bookcase are in sets, evidenced by the same color and size. Wonder what authors and topics they would have been reading.

LadyLydia said...

The chairs are interesting, too. There are two formal chairs in the background. A lady is seated on one. The others look quite modern and of a different style.

LadyLydia said...

The chairs are interesting, too. There are two formal chairs in the background. A lady is seated on one. The others look quite modern and of a different style.

Don and Shelly said...

LadyLydia, what caught my eye was the man's headcovering.... ?

LadyLydia said...

I have not seen that type of cap for men and wondered if it was religious.

Anonymous said...

I enjoyed having a closer look at this painting, though I'm unable to shed any more light on the mystery of the extra chair with the shawl than have any of your other commenters! :o)

Brenda

Lillibeth said...

Perhaps the cap on the man is not religious... did men use to wear caps at home, such as in this painting of Handel?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Retrato_de_Handel.jpg
Maybe it's a thinking cap:-)

Anonymous said...

The man's cap may be to keep his bald head warm.

Anonymous said...

The gentleman with the cap appears to be telling the lady something she does not know that everyone else knows and are waiting to see her reaction.

Also, the protrait painting in the upper right hand corner; maybe and ancestor or just a famous person of the period?

Perhaps the shawl draped on the chair belongs to the lady on the far side of the table who doesn't appear to be wearing one.

Anonymous said...

Back in that era men would often wear a cap(different styles)and a jacket to smoke in and in a different room from the ladies so as not to offend them with smoke. Even back then smoking was offensive to some people.
Notice the jacket the man with the cap is wearing, it has a furry collar and is much more comfortable looking then say a street coat which would be longer.
Also notice the nice chairs made of what appears to be a burl wood and the cushions are generously stuffed and plush.
The gentleman seated has a very plush coat on that indicates not only upper middle class but also it is during the cooler months of the year. The abundance of books in the bookcase indicates these were educated people.

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