Friday, December 21, 2018

The Training of a Victorian Homemaker by Abigail Bryce: E-Book Review

A reader of Home Living recommended this book  two months ago, and due to circumstances, I was delayed reading  and posting my review.

Please note it is not necessary to install Kindle or own a Kindle device. You can read these free on Amazon or an Ap. The cost of the e-book is $2.99 but it is a treasure worth so much more.

But please Abigail, do consider creating the print edition and one that can be printed on our own printers. This is a keeper that many people will enjoy owning, including very young girls who love to read conversational stories.

While I have read a lot of Victorian-era books, I had not actually seen any with the ideals of homemaking and home living, as this one has.

When I read this book I  was delighted at how it exercised my thinking. It is not only about housekeeping during the Victorian era (1837-1901); it has details that can be applied to the home today. It is written as a conversation between an experienced homemaker and a younger woman who is trying to manage her home.

Whether we are fond of the Victorian-era, or despise it, there is one thing none of us can deny: we are all related to a host of (like it or not) Victorians, which should pique our interest. We all have a Victorian grandmother somewhere in history.

 In fact, most modern conveniences we used in the home today were invented by those creative, industrious people. I have read some very horrible descriptions of Victorians but there are some very good things from that era that we should consider. If it were not for their love of families and homes, we would not have this lively history.

If it is at all possible, please get this book.  This is not "light reading" and it will take some concentration, for it has a depth that requires mental chewing and serious digestion! However the author wisely chose a conversation between two women, which makes the information lively and understandable.

This is my Amazon review of the book:

I have always revered the Victorian era for its art and architecture, as well as the beauty of the way cities and neighborhoods were arranged. I loved the clothing, manners, tea cups and furniture.

 This book, however, drew my attention to details I had never before studied or heard of. Such things as ways to make your bread rise better in the winter, hanging clothes outside according to categories so that it can be put away more easily, economical ways to serve food attractively--including how to cook and serve food so that it digests easily, and much, much more.

 Each chapter I read made me see how I could, even today, be a better homemaker, prevent unnecessary spending, pay attention to cleaning and keeping the house in good order. The teacher in the book, a married woman with housekeeping knowledge, shared how she set aside time in her day to study various aspects of home life, such as health, cleanliness, economy, and more.

 I HIGHLY recommend this book to every new homemaker, and even we older ones, to learn how to make life at home good for every family member. Although we may not use the many steps to wash clothes as in previous eras, or cook from a wood stove, it is good to know the details in case we ever have to do it. 

I'd give this book 10 stars if they were available, and I would recommend the author put it in print form so that homemakers may have a copy in their bookshelves.

Intelligently done, Abigail!

There appears to be another book by this author:



Abigail, would you please consider providing an option to print these e-books?  I ask because they are such a good read, and one who has read a lot of homemaking books, will find these are books they can really sink your teeth into!!

Also, a big thank you to our reader Jaclyn Juliette for gifting me with an e-copy of this book and the Amazon donation she gave me, which I will use in part to get the other book by this author.  This would also be a good story on a video drama! If I can carve out the time, I will try and post a video review on her book both on her site and here on this blog.

7 comments:

Jaclyn Juliette said...

Thank you, Lydia! I knew you would love this book! And I know it's perfect for your readers, as well as the 1937 Vintage Homemaking book. I plan on re-reading both of those books over the holidays after the hustle and bustle has settled down. :-)

Look out for another e-mail from me later this weekend. I am short on time right now because I have lots of little ones visiting my home today for a little pre-Christmas party. They're arriving now!

Chat with you soon!

- Jackie from NYC

Jaclyn Juliette said...

Oh, PS! I should have also mentioned to anyone wondering...I read the books using the free Amazon Kindle APP on my iPad. So it is not necessary to own a Kindle reading device to read Amazon e-books.

Gigi's Blog said...

Yes, a download would be great! (A print version - even better!) I do not have a kindle but would enjoy reading this. I also cannot download apps so I just need a simple download.

Linda Newell said...

I would love to see a print version also. It sounds like such an interesting read.
Linda

Feminine Belle said...

Excellent review.

You make me *hungry* for this book! In fact, the food presentation you speak of is like pamphlets I purchased from the 1950's or this blue ribbon book that has recipes from the 1900's.

I know these are not Victorian in nature, but the articles, and presentation is hard to pass up in filling up empty stomachs coming from in from the field that afternoon, or being health conscience enough to share with others which women did in helping bless one another through orally learning, activating listening, and perhaps writing.

Lynn Maust said...

I would greatly appreciate a print copy of this book , as well!

SheLaughs said...

Lydia, you should create a "bookshelf" page, where you list books you've read and enjoyed (like this one!) that you think other ladies might enjoy as well. :) Just a thought for when you have a spare (rare!) moment.

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